Other Endoscopy/Polyp Surveillance Measures



Appropriate Follow-up Interval for Normal Colonoscopy in Average Risk Patients

What are we measuring and why?

A colonoscopy is an exam used to detect abnormal growth or disease in the lower intestine and rectum. It is commonly used to screen for precancerous polyps and colorectal cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends beginning colonoscopies at age 50; however, performing these exams too frequently can increase patients’ exposure to procedural risks and overuse medical resources. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has developed a set of measures to assess whether hospitals are performing colonoscopy screenings within the recommended follow up timeframes, according to patient risk status. 

How are we doing and how do we compare to best practice?

Patients who are between the ages of 50 and 75 with no history of polyps are considered average-risk. For this population, the recommended colonoscopy screening interval is 10 years between exams. MGH reported a 98% compliance rate in 2017, compared to the national average of 88%. This represents the percentage of average-risk patients that received a screening colonoscopy (without biopsy or polypectomy) at MGH and had a recommended follow-up interval of at least 10 years documented in their colonoscopy report.  

  • Current Scores
  • Scores Over Time
  • Higher values are better
88% 100% 98%

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures

MGH: Jan - Dec 2017
CMS: Jan - Dec 2017

92 97 98 80 85 88 100 100 100

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures



 

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