Other Venous Thromboembolism Measures



Hospital Acquired Potentially Preventable Venous Thromboembolism

What are we measuring and why?

Venous Thromboembolism (VTE), or the formation of blood clots that manifest as Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) or Pulmonary Emboli (PE), is a serious condition that can develop during an inpatient stay and cause serious, life-threatening complications. Timely administration of anticoagulation medication has been shown to prevent VTE among at-risk individuals. MGH tracks the percentage of patients who develop VTE during their hospitalization (not present at admission) and are not administered anticoagulants.

How are we doing and how do we compare to best practice?

Our performance for the most recent reporting period, January to December 2016, was 1%. The national average for the same period was slightly higher at 2%.

  • Current Scores
  • Scores Over Time
  • Lower values are better
2% 0% 1%

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.

MGH: Jan - Dec 2016
CMS: Jan - Dec 2016

4 2 1 6 2 2 0 0 0

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.



What are we doing to improve?

MGH conducts a VTE risk assessment screening on all patients upon admission to the hospital. This helps identify those individuals at higher risk for developing VTE. Anticoagulation therapy is initiated immediately if a patient develops VTE during their stay.

What can you do?

Your doctor will assess your risk of developing VTE and, if necessary, prescribe anticoagulants to prevent blood clots from forming. If you develop VTE during your stay, there are a variety of treatment options available to reduce the risk of complications.

 

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