Other Venous Thromboembolism Measures



Warfarin Therapy Discharge Instructions

What are we measuring and why?

MGH monitors the percentage of adult patients diagnosed with Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) who receive written instructions about their condition and blood thinner medication at discharge. These instructions, which are developed from national guidelines, include guidance on appropriate dosing, diet, follow-up, and adverse drug reactions/interactions. Distributing patient educational materials helps prevent complications and further hospitalization.

How are we doing and how do we compare to best practice?

Our performance for the most recent reporting period, January to December 2016, was 95%. This exceeds the national average, which was 93%.

  • Current Scores
  • Scores Over Time
  • Higher values are better
93% 100% 95%

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.

MGH: Jan - Dec 2016
CMS: Jan - Dec 2016

98 97 95 89 92 93 100 100 100

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.



What are we doing to improve?

MGH has used several approaches to improve adherence with this guideline, including clinician-to-clinician teaching. We also developed an automated electronic reminder that prompts providers to conduct patient education at discharge. We recently refined the reminder process and enhanced our electronic systems, identifying and resolving process inefficiencies. These interventions are used selectively to improve the reliability with which we deliver and document recommended care processes.

What can you do?

If you or a family member is hospitalized with VTE, ask your care team about when you can expect to receive discharge instructions. It is very important to ask questions during this process to ensure that you understand and can follow these directions. This includes taking your warfarin exactly as it is prescribed, keeping your diet consistent, and completing follow-up monitoring. It is also important to understand how your anticoagulant may interact with other prescription medications. Your doctor or pharmacist can answer any questions you may have.

 

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