Other Patient Experience-Adult Inpatient Measures



Quiet at Night

What are we measuring and why?

As part of a survey about their experience at Massachusetts General Hospital, patients are asked the following question about our physical environment:

  • During this hospital stay, how often was the area around your room quiet at night?

This information helps us better understand patients’ perceptions of the MGH environment and identify opportunities to improve.

How are we doing and how do we compare to best practice?

Fifty-three percent (53%) of MGH inpatients surveyed indicated that our facilities were "always" quiet at night. This was below the current Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) national average of 62%, but above the Massachusetts state average of 51% (Apr 2017 - Mar 2018 data for both benchmarks). This is a key focus area for improvement.

  • Current Scores
  • Scores Over Time
  • Higher values are better
51% 62% 53%

MGH Source: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Adult Patient Experience Survey administered by Quality Data Management
Comparison Group Source: CMS HCAHPS survey

MGH: Jan-Mar 18
CMS: Apr 17-Mar 18

49 53 51 52 51 53 53 53 52 52 52 52 51 51 51 51 63 63 63 63 62 62 62 62

MGH Source: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Adult Patient Experience Survey administered by Quality Data Management
Comparison Group Source: CMS HCAHPS survey



What are we doing to improve?

MGH recognizes the importance of fostering a quiet healing environment and is committed to minimizing noise levels. The new Lunder facility features a state-of-the-art environment. The physical layout of older buildings has made it difficult to achieve the ideal environment that we seek for our patients, but we will continue to work towards reducing noise levels in all patient facilities. 

Currently, MGH is engaged in a comprehensive effort to implement quiet times on all inpatient units. This involves dimming the lights and minimizing activity and conversations for 1-2 hours in the afternoon and 6-8 hours at night. Smartphones are used in lieu of overhead paging and Yacker Trackers assist in monitoring noise. Unit champions reinforce staff awareness and signage is placed throughout patient care areas to remind staff, patients, and families of designated quiet times. Support departments also assist in reducing sources of noise, such as door alarms, pneumatic tube stations, and pantries.

 

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