Other Heart Attack Measures



Aspirin at Arrival

What are we measuring and why?

MGH tracks the percentage of eligible adult heart attack patients who received aspirin within 24 hours, before or after hospital arrival. Aspirin reduces the tendency of blood to clot by blocking the action of a type of blood cell involved in clotting. Aspirin improves chances of surviving a heart attack and reduces the risk of recurrence in patients who have experienced a heart attack.

How are we doing and how do we compare to best practices?

This data is no longer collected by the Joint Commission (TJC), nor is it publically reported. For the final eight quarters reported, virtually all eligible heart attack patients received aspirin within 24 hours before or after hospital arrival. The Massachusetts General Hospital has achieved scores of  99 - 100%, consistently.  Our performance for the last reporting period, January 2014 to December 2014 was 99%.  The national average for all Joint Commission hospitals was 99%.

Click to see MGH’s performance on this measure by patients’ race.

  • Current Scores
  • Scores Over Time
  • Higher values are better
99% 100% 99.65%

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.

N.B. Data for this measure is no longer being collected, nor is it publically reported.

MGH:Janl 14-Dec 14
TJC: Jan 14-Dec 14

100 100 100 100 99 99.65 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

MGH Source: Hospital administrative data and chart review.
Comparison Group Source: CMS/TJC National Hospital Quality Measures.

N.B. Data for this measure is no longer being collected, nor is it publically reported.



What are we doing to improve?

In the Emergency Department, computerized order entry templates have been created for patients with suspected heart attacks.  Aspirin is listed on these templates as a suggested medication, which helps remind the Emergency Physician to place the order for appropriate patients.

What can you do?

If you or a family member come to the hospital with a heart attack, you can help ensure that eligible heart attack patients get quality care by letting the physician know if the patient has taken an aspirin or by asking the physician if the patient should be given aspirin. If the physician suggests that aspirin is not appropriate, ask why aspirin is not recommended.

 

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